St. Louis in the National Media

St. Louis references in the news. Oh yeah, don't forget our favorite "Top Lists."
First unread post1526 posts
pattimagee wrote:
Fri Feb 09, 2018 2:31 pm
West Lake Landfill Documentary on HBO :shock:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_cont ... x1Tz7c1DTw
I've seen this. Absolutely crazy. Personally, I wouldn't live within 10 miles of the landfill.

One of the most bizarre scenes is when the woman speaks at the meeting who unknowingly moved to the area from Chernobyl of all places.

How the EPA kicked the can down the road this long is just unbelievable.
leeharveyawesome wrote:
Wed Feb 14, 2018 8:09 am
I've seen this. Absolutely crazy. Personally, I wouldn't live within 10 miles of the landfill.
If I had to guess, I'd say about 1/3 of the St. Louis MSA lives within 10 miles of West Lake Landfill. Including all of Maryland Heights, Creve Coeur, St. Charles, Florissant, and even part of Town & Country. So that seems a bit extreme...
White Settlers Buried the Truth About the Midwest’s Mysterious Mound Cities
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/ ... 46/?no-ist
From CityLab:

The Gateway Arch, a Global Icon, Reconnects to St. Louis

Link: https://www.citylab.com/design/2018/03/ ... is/554750/
from Vogue.com

An Insider’s Guide to the Magic of St. Louis, Missouri

https://www.vogue.com/article/insiders- ... s-missouri
So proud of my friend Chris Bauer for doing the photography for Vogue for this layout.
Photo: Courtesy of Chris Bauer / @cbauerphoto

He's local and amazing! Hire him for anything!
https://cbauerphotography.pixieset.com/
https://www.cbauer.photography/
https://www.facebook.com/CBauerPhotography/
This Vogue article is actually a big deal. That's really great press for a market that doesn't really hype St. Louis.
More good buzz from the NY Times:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/14/trav ... dable.html
The "big small town" refrain is so overdone and cliche. Just because a city is friendly, casual, neighborhoody and accessible doesn't mean it feels like a small town. St. Louis has plenty of attributes (good and bad) that make it decidedly NOT small town. Even though the "big small town" quality is usually meant to be endearing, I don't think a lot of people perceive it that way. "Small town" to me comes across as a little patronizing. I generally don't equate small towns with social tolerance, diversity or excitement, do you?

Sorry if I'm being overly-sensitive, but every city of similar size claims to be a "big small town"- it's not like it's unique trait to St. Louis. I guess the fact that practically every PR piece about St. Louis being a big small town is proof that we actually are?
1) Is the CVC paying for these articles? Why did they come out a day apart from each other?
2) I liked the NYT article a lot more. But neither captured the city for me.
stlgasm wrote:The "big small town" refrain is so overdone and cliche. Just because a city is friendly, casual, neighborhoody and accessible doesn't mean it feels like a small town. St. Louis has plenty of attributes (good and bad) that make it decidedly NOT small town. Even though the "big small town" quality is usually meant to be endearing, I don't think a lot of people perceive it that way. "Small town" to me comes across as a little patronizing. I generally don't equate small towns with social tolerance, diversity or excitement, do you?

Sorry if I'm being overly-sensitive, but every city of similar size claims to be a "big small town"- it's not like it's unique trait to St. Louis. I guess the fact that practically every PR piece about St. Louis being a big small town is proof that we actually are?
I agree with you. It bugs me to no end.


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stlgasm wrote:
Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:33 pm
I generally don't equate small towns with social tolerance, diversity or excitement, do you?
To be fair, St Louis is not exactly the most diverse place in the world and is considerably less diverse than pretty much any city of comparable size in either coast (which I assume forms the bulk of these articles' target audience). Not that I think that much can be done about it (i.e. I am not blaming this on anyone in particular or in any specific set of policies), but having moved from one of the coasts, the lack of diversity was the thing that shocked me the most especially for a metro area of its size.
stlgasm wrote:
Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:33 pm
The "big small town" refrain is so overdone and cliche.
I can't stand it either. Washington, Missouri is a "big small town."

I think the expression is getting confused with or an easy, cliched way of saying "a city of neighborhoods." Cherokee, West End, Benton Park, Soulard, Lafayette Sq. etc. each feels like a 'small town'—if you will— pushed together to make this wonderful, beautiful big city of ours. Going from the Loop, to CWE, South Grand, BPW, TGS is one of the most interesting and amazing things of St. Louis. I love just driving around this city. Cities like Orlando and Phoenix—basically the same from one end to the other.

Sidenote: I few years ago I intentionally stopped asking, i.e. coworkers 'what part of town do you live in?' instead asking 'what part of the metro area you call home?' Just trying to wash away the whole 'town' mindset thing.
stlgasm wrote:
Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:33 pm
The "big small town" refrain is so overdone and cliche. Just because a city is friendly, casual, neighborhoody and accessible doesn't mean it feels like a small town.
It may be a cliche but I think it's one shared by most in the region; especially those like that dad whom I bet lives in the County "The County has great schools!" Truthfully, most people in the region don't want a big town feel and that's why we struggle to gain core population. Fortunately that's changing a bit but I think we have quite a ways to go to reach an unqualified feel of "big town" urban vibrancy, (Same with most of our mid-size peers.)
Here's an typical bit of us on an odd bit of media:

Image

I call it "Arch of the Palms." It's from the trailer for a game called "Cities: Skylines." Looks to me like 55 and Memorial have been completely overgrown in the most lovely way. (And sure, the buildings are wrong, and the arch is in the wrong spot, and . . . palm, trees. But I like it.) Just a small thing, but it's a pretty clear reference in a sort of media where we don't get a whole lot of recognition.
Yeah I actually play a lot of Cities: Skylines (gotta fulfill my fantasies of building the perfect city, right?) and the "Arch" ingame is a landmark called the "Business Park", I believe. It's clearly inspired by our Arch but it's much more... squat. It also has pretty much no landscaping aside from a few trees and actually looks more like Saarinen's original vision of the Arch rising up straight out of a sea of buildings.
symphonicpoet wrote:
Wed Apr 18, 2018 1:46 am
Here's an typical bit of us on an odd bit of media:

Image

I call it "Arch of the Palms." It's from the trailer for a game called "Cities: Skylines." Looks to me like 55 and Memorial have been completely overgrown in the most lovely way. (And sure, the buildings are wrong, and the arch is in the wrong spot, and . . . palm, trees. But I like it.) Just a small thing, but it's a pretty clear reference in a sort of media where we don't get a whole lot of recognition.
It looks like it was placed in Florida. Though would note that a few palms can grow in the St. Louis area with minimal to no protection, particularly in a place like downtown. Just not the taller ones, though a number of climate change models do show that over time it could end up being possible with winters on average becoming much less severe.
A fair bunch of my neighbors grow hardy banana palms of a sort that will overwinter. (But don't produce fruit without Herculean effort.) My wife, being Vietnamese, never fails to point such things out.

I've been quite tempted by Cities: Skylines, but I'm still mostly playing a late version of Sim City. (Which also has an arch, though with an odd plinth that makes it look like a toy off someone's shelf.) How does Cities compare?
symphonicpoet wrote:
Thu Apr 19, 2018 12:16 am
I've been quite tempted by Cities: Skylines, but I'm still mostly playing a late version of Sim City. (Which also has an arch, though with an odd plinth that makes it look like a toy off someone's shelf.) How does Cities compare?
For the Arch? They haven't quite gotten it right since SimCity 3000.
For the game itself? It's very good. I'm not a huge fan of the graphics though. I preferred how clean and crisp SimCity 4 was (just without the four axonometric views).
^For the game. It's actually Sim City 4 I've played most recently. Fantastic game.
Really getting off-topic here but Cities: Skylines is fantastic. The graphics are a turn-off for some, but if you purchase it through Steam (which is what I would recommend), you have access to the Steam Workshop for the game which allows anyone in the world to upload content they have created for the game (varying from new buildings to new graphics to entirely new game options), which you can then download and use. Be warned: it is very easy to install far too many assets and make the game literally unplayable (as I have). I would highly recommend it to anyone on this forum. The city-building is probably slightly weaker than SC4 in the vanilla game, but with Workshop Content the possibilities are endless. Anyone on the fence is free to PM me for a more in-depth comparison.
Not a ton of substance to this article but it was nice to be mentioned.

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/e ... city-gems/
jshank83 wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 2:11 pm
Not a ton of substance to this article but it was nice to be mentioned.

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/e ... city-gems/

Thanks for sharing this. It’s refreshing to read an outsider’s perspective of St. Louis that doesn’t dwell on the doom-and-gloom or isn’t a paraphrased press release written by the CVC. It’s also cool that our urban appeal is recognized along with other classic legacy cities that are St. Louis’s true peers, and not random comparisons with Indianapolis or Columbus, etc.