The Twin Daughters Building to be JEMA HQ- 2823 Olive Street

Construction activity, major renovations, office projects, etc. in the Central Corridor -- defined by the area south of Delmar Avenue and North of Interstate 44/55.
Sorry if this has been posted elsewhere. Stumbled across on JEMA's website. Looks like they are making a short move over to Olive from Locust in Midtown Alley.

Image

Announcement: http://jemastl.com/news/2018/2/20/jema- ... -future-hq
Of the 100+ times I have driven, walked, biked, crawled, and cartwheeled down this stretch of Olive, how have I never noticed this building?? I had to find it on Google Earth out of disbelief. It looks like it belongs more in Cincy or Pittsburgh. Also, I like JEMA so this is cool.
What a great old building! I hope they restore it with actual, working shutters (fake shutters are one of my pet peeves).
framer wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 3:32 pm
What a great old building! I hope they restore it with actual, working shutters (fake shutters are one of my pet peeves).
I have a totally stupid question. How do real working shutters work, particularly when combined with modern windows? This has been something that I've always wondered but never chosen to figure out. Particularly when I have a similar reaction to yours. "Those shutters don't do anything, what's the point." But then I realize I don't know how actual working shutters function. And then I forget about it.
jstriebel wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 3:51 pm
I have a totally stupid question. How do real working shutters work, particularly when combined with modern windows?
In terms of their purpose? When used properly, you open the window and close the shutters (no bug screens). This allows a breeze to pass through and blocks out direct sunlight. They're still used this way in Mediterranean countries and similar climates. You typically only turn on the A/C in the hottest hours of the afternoon, usually one of those Mitsubishi mini-split systems. The other biggest advantage is that shutters block heat and sunlight from the outside. Blinds do very little to prevent heat from entering a building. Once sunlight has passed through a window, it's in the building for good.
I'd love to build a house relying on this system but it exposes your house to a lot more bugs, high humidity, the occasional pop-up storm, etc. Plus it's a lot of work depending on the number of windows, going around and managing all of this. It shows in your electricity bill though. Plus mini-split systems are much cheaper than running ductwork through your home.
Technically they can also be closed during heavy storms to protect the glass but we don't really have to worry about that any more.
This is Drury's building in Aegina, Greece where I spent a semester:
http://www.drury.edu//uc/archives/greec ... errace.jpg
http://www.drury.edu//uc/archives/greece/dcg_studio.jpg
You can see how the windows swing (vertically) inward and then the shutters fold in and latch in the center. American shutters usually swing flat against the building and would have a small handle that allows you to grab them when they're fully open. Most days we'd just have the windows open but if it started to get a little warm, we'd close the shutters before trying the A/C.
Here's the funny thing: My mother's house has perfectly functional four-fold shutters of the sort you show in the Med . . . but on the inside of the window. Where they do a lot less good for precisely the reason you've described. Though you can still open the window, close the shutters, and adjust the louvers to suit. Anyway . . . would that building have even had shutters when it was new? Or are those a later addition? Would be just fine without then. Compton and Dry does not depict too many shutters, as I recall.
aprice wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 4:26 pm
jstriebel wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 3:51 pm
I have a totally stupid question. How do real working shutters work, particularly when combined with modern windows?
In terms of their purpose? When used properly, you open the window and close the shutters (no bug screens). This allows a breeze to pass through and blocks out direct sunlight...
This was a great explanation. Thank you!