Residential Projects/Incentives- Where do people come from

A catch-all forum for urban discussion. If it doesn't fit elsewhere, post here.
Proposal-
When a residential project is getting any type of city incentives how about after year 1 of opening the developer produces a report that gives a census if you will about the residents that moved there. Where did they come from ( are we giving incentives to move people in a circle around the city or are they brand new to the city residents)

Have this type of data can also give us an idea of what happens to places that these people leave- especially in the city. Did the old landlord invest in the building to keep up with new development if they're having a hard time replacing residents, did the landlord let the place deteriorate because they didnt want to invest since rents in St.Louis are relatively low and couldn't invest.
I think having all this data would be pretty useful, SLDC can develop a standard form that developers can submit after year 1

Thoughts on what other data could be collected at year 1?
dbInSouthCity wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:37 am
Proposal-
When a residential project is getting any type of city incentives how about after year 1 of opening the developer produces a report that gives a census if you will about the residents that moved there. Where did they come from ( are we giving incentives to move people in a circle around the city or are they brand new to the city residents)

Have this type of data can also give us an idea of what happens to places that these people leave- especially in the city. Did the old landlord invest in the building to keep up with new development if they're having a hard time replacing residents, did the landlord let the place deteriorate because they didnt want to invest since rents in St.Louis are relatively low and couldn't invest.
I think having all this data would be pretty useful, SLDC can develop a standard form that developers can submit after year 1

Thoughts on what other data could be collected at year 1?
Unless it is a big skyscraper like BPV or the 100 (a lot of these units are bought or rented as a second home), I can't imagine new housing is driving people to move into the city. I am sure it helps a bit but most people probably had decided to move to the city or are already here.
Not disagreeing with this by any means but new buildings are more expensive, not necessarily catching those moving to the city for the first time. Perhaps the addition of new buildings makes older buildings like Mansion House more affordable.
Someone who would have otherwise stayed in their 20th Floor Mansion House apartment has now moved to One Cardinal Way. Therefore lessening demand on Mansion House. While subsidizing new buildings to drive down rents in older buildings doesn't sound like a great thing, it might make the city more affordable to those who would otherwise be renting at some apt complex in South County.

Feel free to counter if you feel differently on this, I'm not advocating for subsidies by any means.
Not advocating for the data to be used for policy, at least not yet. Just for informational purposes to begin