4400 Manchester

Renovations and new construction in the Central Corridor -- defined by the area south of Delmar Avenue and North of Interstate 44/55.
^^Look at all that recent infill to the South.
^ FPSE lost 800 people last decade,,,, even if it doesn't grow and just holds even this decade, which I think is a safe assumption given the hundreds of new units, it's just one indication that the population growth in the central corridor should be pretty impressive. The City's CC grew about 5.5% in the 00's iirc so I wouldn't be surprised by 10% growth this decade.
STLrainbow wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:46 pm
^ FPSE lost 800 people last decade,,,, even if it doesn't grow and just holds even this decade, which I think is a safe assumption given the hundreds of new units, it's just one indication that the population growth in the central corridor should be pretty impressive. The City's CC grew about 5.5% in the 00's iirc so I wouldn't be surprised by 10% growth this decade.
I havent looked at any stats, but I would be blown away if the grove didn't have significant growth next census. The 3 current apartment projects are adding hundred of units, by 2019 WUMRC will have built or renovated nearly 150 residences and other companies will build and renovate a ton as well. Plus any other apartment projects that can finish by mid 2019.
^Growth in the central corridor was 11% in the 2000's. With FPSE being the worst performer by total pop loss (786) and second worse on a percentage basis (21.22%).

Would be shocked if the script isn't flipped, with FPSE even being one of the leaders in gains, for the 2010s.
I moved here 6 years ago and this is far and away the biggest transformation to a neighborhood I have seen in the city. I was born and raised in Austin and if very much has that Austin gentrifying vibe to it. Still funky but also lots of money coming in.
wabash wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 3:41 pm
^Growth in the central corridor was 11% in the 2000's. With FPSE being the worst performer by total pop loss (786) and second worse on a percentage basis (21.22%).

Would be shocked if the script isn't flipped, with FPSE even being one of the leaders in gains, for the 2010s.
Hey, I was only off by 100% on my recollection of central corridor growth! Maybe I was thinking of around the 5,000 people or so that were added. Anyway, I suspect another decade of 10%+ growth is a safe assumption, with total CC population nearing 75,000 (starting at 61,000 in 2010)..
Exterior tile going up

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^Excellent.

Hopefully this is a clear financial success for Restoration St. Louis and they put up another one (or 5 or 6) on the Manchester strip someday soon.
For me, just filling out the oddly vacant structures on Manchester and filling in the empty lots would be a great start, then look south.
bwcrow1s wrote:
Wed Dec 27, 2017 3:41 pm
For me, just filling out the oddly vacant structures on Manchester and filling in the empty lots would be a great start, then look south.
Agreed. Odd to see millions poured in on these big projects and the smaller houses and storefronts just empty and/or rotting. Guessing people sitting on them for more money. Still, many have been rehabbed in the past few years.
There's a part of me that thinks we need to change the tax structure so people can't economically sit on vacant property in that way. Perhaps there should be some kind of fee in lieu of sales tax assessed against vacant commercial properties. Give developers more incentive to get someone in there and give the city a way to make up revenue lost to such blatant speculation.
symphonicpoet wrote:
Thu Dec 28, 2017 7:12 pm
There's a part of me that thinks we need to change the tax structure so people can't economically sit on vacant property in that way. Perhaps there should be some kind of fee in lieu of sales tax assessed against vacant commercial properties. Give developers more incentive to get someone in there and give the city a way to make up revenue lost to such blatant speculation.
It looks like most of the boardups near Kinsghighway on Manchester are owned by Grove Properties. They seem to be have been a positive force there and would seemingly want those to come back to life for the sake of all their properties.

4552, 4544 and more.

http://www.grovepropertiesllc.com/
Well, now that I've seen this building in person, I've got to say that I find it to be hideously ugly. Really awful.
^Why's that?
^It looks like a kid's toy box. It's gimmicky. The colors and random patterning are garish. In five years, it's gonna look ridiculously dated.

But hey, that's just me.
Fair points. It's probably not any consolation (perhaps more disturbing than anything), but there is a 57 story building in Downtown Brooklyn called Ava DoBro much of which is covered in the exact same randomized grey/white/blue color panels. It hits all of the same (unfortunate) points you just made and adds having a dumb name to the mix.

I haven't seen the finished product yet, but I think some more color - even if a bit juvenile and quickly dated - will be good for that strip. And I'm just still glad it got built.
Some more shots (February 3, 2018)

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Cool. Pro: Takes attention away from UCBC's huge concrete block wall (which they need to muralize). Con: Pretty annoying for whomever rents out that front corner apartment. So, one persons pain is everyone else's gain.

The views from those fourth and fifth story apartments are going to be excellent.
They open April 1st and they are ~30% leases. We toured it last week. Great place and affordable for new construction.


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Took a tour of the building yesterday. Took few pictures of the construction and the views for your enjoyment.

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Unfinished lobby

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Eventually going to be a small wading pool and amenity deck

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View of neighborhood construction from balcony

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Average Unit

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Bathrooms

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View of Manchester strip from another balcony

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Hallways getting painted, workers in every room
^Thanks for sharing. I particularly like the shot of the Manchester strip.