Centene Corporation HQ's

Discuss new retail, dining, business and residential projects within the City of Clayton, the center of St. Louis County government.
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Applications were submitted today for the pedestrian bridge:

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Dislike.
Add some colorful LED lighting or other features and I'd be happier with this. I get that the bridge is going to happen no matter what, so whatever can be done to make it more artistic or visually pleasing would be greatly appreciated.
What a awful designed bridge. Apparently, the trend of sky bridges never did reach Clayton. Do they not know St. Louis no longer has the St. Louis Center Mall Sky-bridges? Or that the one connecting the AT&T Building to Southwestern Bell is going to come down? Jeez. I give this Bridge a F-. A bridge is not useful in an urban setting anymore. What, are the sidewalks not safe or is it because you don’t want to somehow get lost walking from one building to the one literally across the street?
This bridge has always been sold as a public art piece. I'm not sure this fits the bill.

I'd love to see them dump this money into a more pedestrian friendly Hanley crossing. However, Hanley is a very busy road and will be seeing increased traffic with all the development so that's a tough ask. Centene management also prefers ease of mobility throughout their campus so employees can efficiently gather for meetings and the like.
I am not as anti sky bridge as others but I don't get why they don't put them higher. If the idea is to make it easier to get between buildings then put it 15 floors up (or in the case near the top of the shorter building.) If you pretty much have to go all the way down to the ground level anyways then what is the point?
Now this is what I call a Sky Bridge!

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jshank83 wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 8:28 pm
I am not as anti sky bridge as others but I don't get why they don't put them higher. If the idea is to make it easier to get between buildings then put it 15 floors up (or in the case near the top of the shorter building.) If you pretty much have to go all the way down to the ground level anyways then what is the point?
I'm going out on a limb here, but I would guess the higher you make them the more of an engineering challenge it becomes, as the expansion and contraction and wind sway and so forth of two otherwise independent buildings will change that space more higher up. Closer to the ground the earth ties things together a little more. And even one story up at least you've eliminated a grade crossing, so there is that. And it's one story fewer you need to go down. (And if most of your conference spaces are on that level anyway . . . ?) At any height above the pavement you don't have to wait for the light and you don't risk getting hit by angry residents from the Crescent still sore over the view.

But even with a few less downtown there's still a ton of them. There's one from the courthouse to the jail. Bank of America has a pair. US Bank three. Greensfelder has one. The convention center has one. AT&T will still have one from Southwestern Bell west to the garage, correct? The rest are being torn down because AT&T is dumping a building, thus making it not a part of their campus anymore. And elsewhere in town a certain hospital continues to expand it's already interstate highway grade bowl of elevated pedestrian spaghetti. Heck, there's even still one into the Railways Exchange. Honestly, I count more than a dozen even if AT&T does get rid of that last one. And the overwhelming majority are just a couple of stories above ground. the only high ones I know are out at Barnes. (And boy is the top one great, by the way. One of the best views in town.) Anyway . . . having used a bunch of them in different places I rather like them. Sure, they arguably take life off sidewalks, but if you're using them odds are you wouldn't have done anything lively on the sidewalk anyway. And I've taken them just as often to reach bits of sidewalk that would otherwise be less accessible, thereby giving both sides of a major street an even shot at my lunch money. Meh. They have ups and downs. this one isn't the prettiest, but I don't see why it should offend.
symphonicpoet wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 2:21 am
At any height above the pavement you don't have to wait for the light and you don't risk getting hit by angry residents from the Crescent still sore over the view.

This made me chuckle
From the application document:

[quote]September 5, 2017
CENTENE URBAN CAMPUS, SD1 HANLEY PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ARB SUBMITTAL
EXHIBIT 1: DESIGN NARRATIVE
The pedestrian bridge linking the new Centene Subdistrict 1 office tower and with the existing Centene
Plaza office tower is a creative response to an important functional and safety-enhancing element.
To enhance the connectivity of the Centene campus and provide an option for safe crossing over Hanley
Road for building occupants, the bridge provides a weatherproof enclosure connecting level 2 of each
building. An adjacent internal monumental stair in the SD1 tower allows the cross-campus link to the
Centene Plaza café and conference spaces with SD1 tower café and conference spaces.
This connection will benefit building occupants moving between buildings, and enhance safety, by reducing
pedestrian traffic at the Hanley/Forsyth intersection known for its high level of vehicle traffic and
potentially risky sloping grades. Pedestrians using this bridge will ultimately exit each tower to the Forsyth
or Carondelet sidewalks as they move further east and west, activating the urban realm.
The bridge architecture is complementary to both adjacent office towers, using the same base glass
substrate and silver metallic painted aluminum detailing. The K-shaped plan of the bridge recognizes its
transition between the taller new SD1 office tower and the smaller existing Centene Plaza tower by
increasing its width and volume on the larger SD1 side while decreasing it slightly at the smaller Centene
Plaza side. The “pinch” near the center is offset to respect the smaller and larger office tower volumes and
provide a spatially dynamic path of travel for bridge users, opening wider toward each office tower as they
arrive at their destination.
An interior screen element reduces visual connection to fast moving vehicle traffic underneath and
potential feelings of vertigo for users while allowing daylighting and views outward and upward.
The exterior glazing takes a cue from the vibrantly colored glass canopy at Centene Plaza and employs a
permanent colored PVB inner layer laminated between the bridge’s safety glass layers. The deep to light
blue gradated coloring is visually interesting and calming while not being distracting to drivers on Hanley
Road below. [/quote]
symphonicpoet wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 2:21 am
jshank83 wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 8:28 pm
I would guess the higher you make them the more of an engineering challenge it becomes, as the expansion and contraction and wind sway and so forth of two otherwise independent buildings will change that space more higher up.

Yes. Here's how it works on the Petronas Towers' bridge on the 42nd floor:

"The towers feature a double decker skybridge connecting the two towers on the 41st and 42nd floors, which is the highest 2-story bridge in the world. It is not attached to the main structure, but is instead designed to slide in and out of the towers to prevent it from breaking, as the towers sway several feet in towards and away from each other during high winds."

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These Centene buildings are also secure facilities. Having a skywalk helps complete the "secure loop."
For those who want daily, hourly, or live updates... here is the link to the live construction cam:

https://app.truelook.com/?u=cp1471447396#tl_live

You can see the entire site from the top of the current Centene tower looking down and even get a bird's eye view of the parking garage side in the distance too.
^You can really see how far back the tower is set from Forsyth.
Yes, they'll want to preserve their views of downtown in the current building. Looks like steel has hit street level for the front park of the site (non-tower.) Looking like they are moving rather quickly on the main building as well.
You can really see the excavation for the parking garage.

https://vimeo.com/235534632




source: http://www.constructforstl.org/video-ga ... expansion/
climbing several stories above the fence.

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Stopped by to take several ground level images of the project got my website’s Project Update page regarding the project. It’s unbelievable how large it is when you are standing right next to it.ImageImageImage

And then the link below is where my images went to. This will be updated every two weeks. http://www.buildingstlnews.com/centene-centre.html
The main concrete structure in the center seems to be going up on its own. How do they lift the big yellow metal structure after they add each floor?
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I really hope they double checked those beam specifications to avoid slopped and buckled floors.
Not even that high and you've already got CWE/Downtown views. Nice.
Live shot from 10/24/17

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Caption this:

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The squeal to Disney's UP really stinks.