Pittsburgh

Discuss anything urban that's pertinent to our understanding of the USA.
Starting a general thread for Pittsburgh topics.

First up, despite the hype Pittsburgh and Allegheny Co. still losing population:

http://www.post-gazette.com/local/city/ ... 1705250024
Is Pittsburgh PA maybe a similar story to STL, where it is simultaneously shedding lower income residents in struggling, high vacancy neighborhoods in exchange for higher income residents in dense, high-amenity neighborhoods?
onecity wrote:
Thu May 25, 2017 9:35 am
Is Pittsburgh PA maybe a similar story to STL, where it is simultaneously shedding lower income residents in struggling, high vacancy neighborhoods in exchange for higher income residents in dense, high-amenity neighborhoods?
That would be my guess. For whatever reason, though, metro Pittsburgh has steadily lost population while metro STL has steadily gained population overall. I think.
Geography might play a role there. Available land for affordable exurban construction might be more scarce, thus driving prices up and limiting the potential for sprawl. Metro St. Louis has bee gaining population slightly, on paper, but the definition of what's in the metro area keeps getting bigger too. That may not be possible there.
Geography seems to be a counterweight to Pittsburgh's expansion, but the irregular topography adds to its urbanity - my impression is that Pittsburgh's downtown is abnormally dense for a city of its size (even its historical size) precisely because it is hard to build there.

Another interesting point of comparison is fragmented local government: definitely not at the same magnitude as St Louis, but Pittsburgh also features municipality enclaves like Cincinnati (independent municipalities that are completely surrounded by the larger city). Again, this makes sense given the topography.
Pittsburgh fares quite well on a lot of economic indicators compared to other compact city peers.

For example, it has the lowest 2016 poverty rate with 19.2%, and only Baltimore and Pittsburgh have a black poverty rate under 30%. Saint Louis City fares pretty well, too on poverty, tho it has a higher disparity between rates of black (32%%) and whites (13.2%). Minneapolis has a whopping disparity among the compact city group with the lowest white poverty rate (12.4%) and highest black poverty rate (43.7%).

(I looked at STL and compact peers Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Minneapolis; all of which are under 100 sq. mi. Compact non-peers include SanFran, D.C., & SEA,)