MetroLink Fare Collection

All the ways we move people and things: trains, planes, automobiles, biking, walking, etc.
Now that Metro has their new ticket vending machines (TVMs) at many stations, they should consider switching to some kind of smart card system-the new validators and TVMs are able to handle smart cards. Almost a year ago when the Shrewbury line opened, I was talking to an ambassador on the platform at Forsyth who told me that is Metro's goal, however he couldn't give me a timetable. Has anyone heard anything about this?

Or, you know, accepting $20 bills in the machines.

If the costs to implement smart cards is anything like what is was in Atlanta, I'd much rather Metro spend the money on 3-4 miles of light rail or 8-10 miles of streetcar, instead.

Are you talking about MARTA in Atlanta? I last caught MARTA at Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta Inernational in 2003-I don't remember the payment system. I would be interested to know what it costed ATL taxpayers. :roll:
Now that Metro has their new ticket vending machines (TVMs) at many stations, they should consider switching to some kind of smart card system-the new validators and TVMs are able to handle smart cards. Almost a year ago when the Shrewbury line opened, I was talking to an ambassador on the platform at Forsyth who told me that is Metro's goal, however he couldn't give me a timetable. Has anyone heard anything about this?




Metro has initiated its procurement process to purchase a new fare collection system. This will include new fareboxes, smart card validators at all stations (relocated somewhat), and new fare machines in Illinois. (probably)



The fare machines must all be fiber connected.



The first step will be be hire someone to develop the technical specifications.



The Atlanta system was very expensive in large part because they set up a new system to turnstyles for their system.



We have some of the funds for the system, but not all.



If the referendum fails next February, however, it may not make much sense spending any money for a system that's 40 % smaller in Missouri.

Just a quick story about increased checks for valid Metro tickets/passes . . . Metro's doing a good job, but there has to be an easier way . . . .



http://stlurbanworkshop.blogspot.com/2009/03/metrolink-security-in-full-effect.html

Hope I'm not hijacking the thread but this is vaguely related to fare collection.



Yesterday morning there was a man on the platform at Shrewsbury who was boarding the train, early morning -- well dressed, carrying a briefcase, just to set the scene. Before he walked into the door, he snapped a picture of the train across the platform. One of the security guards started yelling at him and literally ran over to him. She said he must have permission of Metro to take pictures. He kept saying he didn't know, didn't see it posted, but she was really belligerent. I'm not sure what she expected him to do at that point, but she just kept yelling.



He finally walked into the train and sat down. She came back in a few minutes later and checked his fare (he had one) and then wrote him a citation for taking a picture.



My question is - what authority do fare checkers have in writing tickets for things other than fares? I know the announcements talk about food/drink on the train, but it doesn't seem like taking a picture would qualify. Any insight?

bprop wrote:
Hope I'm not hijacking the thread but this is vaguely related to fare collection.



Yesterday morning there was a man on the platform at Shrewsbury who was boarding the train, early morning -- well dressed, carrying a briefcase, just to set the scene. Before he walked into the door, he snapped a picture of the train across the platform. One of the security guards started yelling at him and literally ran over to him. She said he must have permission of Metro to take pictures. He kept saying he didn't know, didn't see it posted, but she was really belligerent. I'm not sure what she expected him to do at that point, but she just kept yelling.



He finally walked into the train and sat down. She came back in a few minutes later and checked his fare (he had one) and then wrote him a citation for taking a picture.



My question is - what authority do fare checkers have in writing tickets for things other than fares? I know the announcements talk about food/drink on the train, but it doesn't seem like taking a picture would qualify. Any insight?




Since when is taking a picture illegal and leads to a citation? I can recall several times in which these rent-a-thugs told me to put away the camera while using Metro. One time I took a picture of a Neoplan AN440 CNG on Manchester, the driver slammed on the brakes and pulled over. She got out and yelled at me "why the f*** you did take a picture of meeh?", I told her I wanted a picture of the bus, not her. However, she had this really bad attitude and threatened to call her supervisor and complained I was making her late. I just pretend I deleted the picture and then moved on. Another time I remember at the Clayton Metrolink station a rent-a-thug harassed a Wash-U student for taking a picture of a Metrolink train pulling into the station! They need to post a sign or something about their photography policy, otherwise many people don't know about it.:roll:



As for the machines, they need one that takes credit card. There are many times when I just want to ride, but can't come up with enough cash to ride! I end up going to Schnucks and buying a day pass!

^ What they need to do is let people take pictures of trains. In fact, I think it's un-American not to!

If we can't take pictures of the trains, they shouldn't be allowed to set up public surveillance. What's fair is fair, Billy Jean.

May I take photos of the MetroLink System or MetroBus Centers?



Photography on the Metro system is permitted with the following limitations. Photographers and videographers who plan to take photos or video for commercial use, or who need to set up tripods, lighting or other equipment need prior approval. For approval call 314-982-1440 or e-mail SpeakerTourResearch@metrostlouis.org. Please be advised that security personnel may approach photographers and videographers to inquire about their purpose. Activities may be limited for security, safety or customer convenience. Photography of critical infrastructure including MetroLink tracks, bridges, and tunnels is not permitted.




Their website lists a reasonable photo policy. Staff reaction listed above does not seem consistent with the policy.

The part about not permitting photography of MetroLink tracks, bridges, and tunnels is a nice way of essentially prohitbiting photography of MetroLink in its entirety.



Personally, I don't understand what we're protecting with bans on photography. What is a photo going to reveal that over 60,000 riders don't see everyday?



Edit: I believe the last three sentences are relatively new as I remember Metro's photo policy being much more lax in the past if for no other reason than there wasn't really much of a policy, at all.

Photographer's Rights as of 2002. May be outdated by now, but I will look into it.

innov8ion wrote:
What's fair is fair, Billy Jean.




:lol:

MattnSTL wrote:
Photographer's Rights as of 2002. May be outdated by now, but I will look into it.




Thanks. I was going to post in that thread too. So it says you can photograph from almost any public place, such as airports. Are Metrolink facilities a public place? They're not owned by the government per se, but a quasi-government company. And if they can't enforce recreational photography, how can they enforce something like drinking a beverage on the train, even water which technically is not allowed?

shoot.gif



Thread: hijacked
The no photography without approval is not just Metro. Dart has the same policy. It is all due to the impact of September 11th upon public transit. The security guards are all tried to watch for people photographing the system since they may be terrorists or working for terrorists.



Sad really

bprop, did you see if the guard confiscated the camera/film/memory or demand the photographer erase his images?



Consider a terrorist who decides to case a place. He may or may not get caught by a guard, if one is present.



If he is not caught, then he takes the photographs and gets whatever information he was seeking.



If he is caught, by the MetroLink example above he is given a citation and the guard perhaps demands that he erase his memory card. In that case, he still has the information he needs. There is simply an added "cost of doing business." He must pay the citation, and use a $50 piece of unerase software to recover the images.



That even assumes a person intent on committing acts of violence is going to even bother paying such a citation, or that they didn't hand the guard a false ID in the first place.



This doesn't seem particularly effective against terrorism, but it does do a great job of hassling perfectly well meaning people.

ben1040 wrote:
bprop, did you see if the guard confiscated the camera/film/memory or demand the photographer erase his images?





I did not hear any verbal indication of such. He put away his camera and that's the last I saw of it. Agreed that it's entirely meaningless and ineffective. Let's say he had the card confiscated. He comes back 20 minutes later and takes another one. Or "talks" on his camera phone while snapping a picture. Writing citations like that is just making friends the way Metro does best. btw, who gets the money from the citation?

I was in a situation where security got upset and instructed me to delete the "offending" pictures. I did so, knowing that I could unerase them later when I got home. Guess who got the last laugh? That's right, me. :)

So anyone else here actually received a ticket on Metrolink?

Grover wrote:
So anyone else here actually received a ticket on Metrolink?




I took Metrolink to the NCAA Wrestling Championship on Friday and the passenger I sat next to got cited for not validating her ticket! She bought the ticket at the machine at Skinker, but didn't validate because it already had the date on it, she assumed it was okay to use it. :roll: I bought my day pass at Schnucks because they take credit card. What was interesting is that the roundtrip to Scottrade and back the the Brentwood I-64 station these rent-a-thugs came onboard both trips and asked to see everyone's fares. However, on the way back to Brentwood it was shocking, as three rent-a-thugs hop onboard and one stands at the end of the train while the other two check fares! Its almost like a police state on Metrolink now! I couldn't even take a picture on the Metrolink train or record my ride on Metrolink anymore!:shock: :cry:



I did take pics of some of Metro's Neoplan CNG buses though, as well as ride one before the Wrestling started! :)
b777stl wrote:
Now that Metro has their new ticket vending machines (TVMs) at many stations, they should consider switching to some kind of smart card system-the new validators and TVMs are able to handle smart cards. Almost a year ago when the Shrewbury line opened, I was talking to an ambassador on the platform at Forsyth who told me that is Metro's goal, however he couldn't give me a timetable. Has anyone heard anything about this?


This is a part of the Moving Transit Forward plan.
What are the "new" Ticket Vending machines? I took the metro before the holidays in December to the airport and did not notice anything.

Do they accept credit card? I was going to take the metro link this morning... but had no cash. (I only carry plastic, no cash) So I didnt even bother.
I will miss the wide variety of one dollar coins.