BJC Jewish Hospital demo & Children's Hospital Expansion

Construction activity, major renovations, office projects, etc. in the Central Corridor -- defined by the area south of Delmar Avenue and North of Interstate 44/55.
They're building an absolute monstrosity of a garage next to the Metrolink tracks, intended to handle 3,000 ( :shock: ) employees for BJC, Wash U. Medicine, and College of Pharmacy. Hopefully that will relieve some of the pressure on the garage at Euclid and Parkview Place.
wabash wrote:
They're building an absolute monstrosity of a garage next to the Metrolink tracks, intended to handle 3,000 ( :shock: ) employees for BJC, Wash U. Medicine, and College of Pharmacy. Hopefully that will relieve some of the pressure on the garage at Euclid and Parkview Place.


I hope it does.

I know people that live in the NW corner of The Grove and BJC employees absolutely kill them during the day by talking all the street parking then taking the pedestrian bridge over. Even the simple act of getting an appliance delivered or having a plummer over is a task.
wabash wrote:
^Can you see the new tower crane(s?) for the Opus project from your building?


I can see one peaking over the top of the Chase.
The new buildings on Kingshighway have been officially topped-out. We should be seeing curtain wall very soon.
The glass cylinder thingy is fully framed, now, and glass is going in over at the Children's building.
Image
dweebe wrote:
wabash wrote:
They're building an absolute monstrosity of a garage next to the Metrolink tracks, intended to handle 3,000 ( :shock: ) employees for BJC, Wash U. Medicine, and College of Pharmacy. Hopefully that will relieve some of the pressure on the garage at Euclid and Parkview Place.


I hope it does.

I know people that live in the NW corner of The Grove and BJC employees absolutely kill them during the day by talking all the street parking then taking the pedestrian bridge over. Even the simple act of getting an appliance delivered or having a plummer over is a task.



When my wife was a nurse there they just parked further east down Clayton and were shuttled to the campus. Not sure why people would park in the neighborhood instead
Here are some pics from the rooftop

West
https://twitter.com/moorlander/status/7 ... 7223117824

East
https://twitter.com/moorlander/status/7 ... 0648946693


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ImageImage
Excited to see the new BJC North and Children's Hospital Buildings receiving cladding.


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From Clayton......it looks nice. The cladding - although not finished - is already adding more "sparkle" to the CWE skyline when looking east.
The tower cranes are disappearing.
^ and the "Coal Bunker" crane. So anyone know if they plan to start right into the Queeny Tower phase 2 portion of the campus renewal plan once Phase one wraps next year?
Yea that looks like the plan as soon as phase 1 is fully finished they'll start on phase 2. Phase 2 will be interesting as that's the most prominent building seen by most
City official: Upper floors of new BJC building are 'buckling'


ST. LOUIS • The city building commissioner says it appears the top floors of the north tower of BJC HealthCare's new building near Kingshighway and Forest Park Avenue are "buckling" and he is asking the engineer in charge to verify that the floors were built correctly.






http://www.stltoday.com/business/local/ ... DBFD838DDD
moorlander wrote:
Fri Sep 01, 2017 1:24 pm
City official: Upper floors of new BJC building are 'buckling'


ST. LOUIS • The city building commissioner says it appears the top floors of the north tower of BJC HealthCare's new building near Kingshighway and Forest Park Avenue are "buckling" and he is asking the engineer in charge to verify that the floors were built correctly.






http://www.stltoday.com/business/local/ ... DBFD838DDD
Yea the rumors have going for a while specifically the IV pole story from a couple nurses my wife used to work with
As a lay person in regards to architecture... how bad is this?

Fixable but costly? Happens all the time? Not a big deal, not a small deal?
pattimagee wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 9:59 am
As a lay person in regards to architecture... how bad is this?

Fixable but costly? Happens all the time? Not a big deal, not a small deal?
Someone else is welcome to differ but I've never heard of this happening. Honestly I have no idea why Floors 4-6 would be slanted but none of the others are. It's not a foundation issue if it's just 4-6.
My hope is that it's just the concrete subfloor, in which case it should be an easy fix.
Has anyone heard the actual cause of this??? This is a little ridiculous that they haven't publicly stated what the actual problem is.
aprice wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 11:12 am
This is a little ridiculous that they haven't publicly stated what the actual problem is.
I'm sure their lawyers have them muzzled.
I'm amazed they were able to go this long without the story officially being printed in the press. It's got to be a PR nightmare to have your shiny, new, expensive hospital viewed as structurally damaged or not perfect. They absolutely should maintain silence until they 1) know exactly what is going on and 2) can release a statement downplaying the severity (even if it's like demolition worthy severe) and spin it into a positive ("so the floors were a little unlevel, but we took this opportunity to enhance our design so it's actually a win for the city!")
I've heard that the steel beams they used for the upper floors were ordered without "Camber" to save $$, Camber would have the beams bent slightly upwards, so when the concrete floor is poured, the flex from the weight would straighten out to level. Since the beams they used started straight, they flexed and wound up bowing downward.
topher wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 1:22 pm
I've heard that the steel beams they used for the upper floors were ordered without "Camber" to save $$, Camber would have the beams bent slightly upwards, so when the concrete floor is poured, the flex from the weight would straighten out to level. Since the beams they used started straight, they flexed and wound up bowing downward.
Seems like a simple fix. Take the existing concrete floor and beams out, flip the beams, and repour the floors. Voila, level floors.
Self leveling concrete
MattnSTL wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 4:11 pm
topher wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 1:22 pm
I've heard that the steel beams they used for the upper floors were ordered without "Camber" to save $$, Camber would have the beams bent slightly upwards, so when the concrete floor is poured, the flex from the weight would straighten out to level. Since the beams they used started straight, they flexed and wound up bowing downward.
Seems like a simple fix. Take the existing concrete floor and beams out, flip the beams, and repour the floors. Voila, level floors.
Doubt it would work, the beams would probably just rebound to their original uncambered state upon removal. Flip them and you repeat the issue. Plus it would be extremely costly.
moorlander wrote:Self leveling concrete
Most likely. Of course it depends on the severity of the bowing, big floor plates could mean a lot of deflection. If it's several inches the volume required could be pretty large. In the end it's probably structurally fine as long as the beams had the correct cross-section, since as stated cambered beams are usually selected because they bow to level by design not because of any inherent gains to strength or stiffness, but is certainly a huge embarrassment to the project engineers.

If the bowing were due to the beams being undersized or incorrectly spaced that would have been a structural issue and be a huge financial impact to the project. Demo, lawsuits etc. Hard to imagine a mistake like that.

Of course it's hard to believe they were caught surprised at the bowing due to standard versus cambered beams. Steel structures are pretty well understood and the building techniques are pretty well established. They are all a little different but the basics of building one isn't exactly uncharted territory anymore.
STLEnginerd wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:13 pm
MattnSTL wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 4:11 pm
topher wrote:
Thu Sep 07, 2017 1:22 pm
I've heard that the steel beams they used for the upper floors were ordered without "Camber" to save $$, Camber would have the beams bent slightly upwards, so when the concrete floor is poured, the flex from the weight would straighten out to level. Since the beams they used started straight, they flexed and wound up bowing downward.
Seems like a simple fix. Take the existing concrete floor and beams out, flip the beams, and repour the floors. Voila, level floors.
Doubt it would work, the beams would probably just rebound to their original uncambered state upon removal. Flip them and you repeat the issue. Plus it would be extremely costly.
Lol. I wasn't serious. :lol:
Eric Vickers is suing BJC, seeking $150 million dollars on behalf of the “African-American Business and Construction Workers Association”.

Oh, and he wants an immediate halt to all construction on the BJC Renewal Project.

http://www.constructforstl.org/small-wm ... m-lawsuit/