Better Together...or not

Discuss new retail, dining, business and residential projects within St. Louis County, including Chesterfield, Riverport, Earth City, Westport and more.
First unread post674 posts
CarexCurator wrote:
gary kreie wrote:
8. They have unusual schools. Not that I can think of


We have a culinary school, a couple coding dojos, and an aviation program. I'm sure it gets weirder when you really think about it. We teach taxonomic botany better than pretty much anyone, and that's a very unusual thing to do.

We could probably be weirder in that respect though.

I'll open a nose-picking school, if you guys really think it will help the city.
I'm amazed that the St. Louis School for Wizards and Wit...err, I mean, School for non-Mugg... crap.
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So how about them Cardinals?!
CarexCurator wrote:
gary kreie wrote:
8. They have unusual schools. Not that I can think of


We have a culinary school, a couple coding dojos, and an aviation program. I'm sure it gets weirder when you really think about it. We teach taxonomic botany better than pretty much anyone, and that's a very unusual thing to do.

We could probably be weirder in that respect though.


From the article:

8. They have unusual schools. Early in our stay, we would ask what was the most distinctive school to visit at the K–12 level. If four or five answers came quickly to mind, that was a good sign.

The examples people suggested ranged widely. Some were “normal” public schools. Some were charters. Some emphasized career and technical training, like Camden County High School, in Georgia. Some were statewide public boarding schools, like the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, and the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Sciences. Some were religious or private schools. The common theme was intensity of experimentation.


Sounds like they're referring to schools like the medical/bioscience high school in Skinker-DeBaliviere, the Hawthorne Leadership School for Girls, Grand Center Arts Academy, etc.
HB1686 voted Do Pass by the Select Committee on State and Local Governments! Will it make it to the floor?
context:

HB 1686 -- MUNICIPAL DISINCORPORATION
SPONSOR: Burns
COMMITTEE ACTION: Voted "Do Pass" by the Standing Committee on
Local Government by a vote of 11 to 0.
This bill decreases the number of signatures required on a petition
to disincorporate a city of the fourth class or a village in St.
Louis County from 50% to 25% of voters, and decreases the voter
approval percentage for disincorporation from 60% to 50% plus one
voter.
The bill also establishes a disincorporation procedure for a city
of the third class or a constitutional charter or home rule city in
St. Louis County that is the same as the disincorporation procedure
for a city of the fourth class or a village in St. Louis County.
This bill is the same as HB 741 (2015).
PROPONENTS: Supporters say that this bill makes the
disincorporation process a little easier.
Testifying for the bill were Representative Burns and the Missouri
Council For A Better Economy dba Better Together.
OPPONENTS: There was no opposition voiced to the committee.
Stltoday - Report on municipal court reform delivered to Missouri Supreme Court

The Missouri Supreme Court does not have the authority to order consolidation of St. Louis County’s myriad municipal courts, a working group assigned to study municipal court reform said Tuesday in its report.


http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/crim ... b7e30.html
Sort of off topic, but thank God that the Post-Dispatch website has been overhauled. Even if it isn't perfect, it is a massive improvement over the broken an nearly unusable mess that used to be stltoday.
Let's just join the Metro-East. House bill to separate St. Louis City from the state of Missouri.

http://www.house.mo.gov/billsummary.aspx?bill=HCR107&year=2016&code=R
CarexCurator wrote:
Let's just join the Metro-East.


Because they have it all figured out... :shock:
That's $22 per resident. What would you do with an extra $22?

Vinita Park mayor makes more than twice the average of other municipality mayors

While most of mayors average around $15,000, the Vinita Park Mayor James McGee gets $40,000; this in a city of just 1,800 people, where 30 percent of the residents live below the poverty line. In fact, McGee says he deserves more money, since he serves as both mayor and city administrator.


http://fox2now.com/2016/03/02/vinita-pa ... ty-mayors/
Vinita Park doesn't need both!!! It probably doesn't even need a full time mayor either!
Fragmentation is a distraction and allocation of resources that crowd out dealing with the problems they should be highest priority.

Resisting City Consolidation

http://www.timesnewspapers.com/Articles ... ation.html
"I think Webster and Kirkwood could get together as a borough," said McDonnell. "A lot of smaller towns would get put in our borough and would completely lose their identity. And we would have that discussion as to whether we are the Kirkwood-Webster Borough or the Webster-Kirkwood Borough."


*sigh*

forest for the trees.
http://www.riverfronttimes.com/newsblog ... =hootsuite
I understand that this would never happen, but I still love thinking about what an interesting situation it would be.
"And we would have that discussion as to whether we are the Kirkwood-Webster Borough or the Webster-Kirkwood Borough."


that this is their primary concern is precisely why we can't make any progress. such parochial, small-minded idiocy.
I can certainly see the potential drawbacks to larger boroughs. I mean, I can't imagine Kirkwood's walkable downtown would be improved by lumping its governance in with Ballwin and Twin Oaks residents, for example. But the concern over neighborhood culture is way overblown. I mean, even the city has distinct neighborhoods! It's not that hard, guys!
^indeed neighborhoods in the city have identity and culture without having their own city hall, police force, etc.
With so many fragments there are 1000s of opportunities for collaboration. I'm not impressed. The painstaking effort to collaborate on one thing or another is a waste of effort. Collaboration by default (merging) frees time and money up to work on other bigger more-challenging issues.

CBN - It's About Good Governance

http://www.communitybuildersstl.org/ind ... overnance/
Collaboration by default (merging) frees time and money up to work on other bigger more-challenging issues.


Perhaps they could aim toward showing and helping voters realize a portion of the savings in the form of lower taxes? From what I've seen so far, the only actual financial projections are in the area of fire protection, and not only are any savings spoken for, but it will cost an additional $198 million and add thousands to the public payroll.

Not a good start if your intent is to try to make people believe that merging creates efficiencies.
For numerous poor towns consolidation savings are likely to go to actually running a proper town and filling the gap left by not ticketing as much, I'd wager.
I always figured the main benefit of consolidation was being able to address regional issues, not financial savings. Focusing on the savings feels like a bit of a con to me, although I don't doubt there are savings to be had.
I've always viewed the savings as the vehicle in which to arrive to the consolidation. Regional issues absolutely need addressing, but so far zero communities have come out in favor of disincorporating or merging to consolidate. Focusing on the savings may be the lesser of the greater good, however it probably leads to a greater chance of actual action.
chaifetz10 wrote:
I've always viewed the savings as the vehicle in which to arrive to the consolidation. Regional issues absolutely need addressing, but so far zero communities have come out in favor of disincorporating or merging to consolidate. Focusing on the savings may be the lesser of the greater good, however it probably leads to a greater chance of actual action.


This. And the fact that BT describes inefficiencies in terms of dollars-even when compared to e.g. unigov, which ostensibly has addressed its regional issues AND realizes a savings over multigov St Louis on top of that. Their projections for St Louis just don't bear that out thus far.
The problem I have is that regional cooperation is an obvious outcome of consolidation, and without BT addressing it, opponents are free to define it in their own terms. Which is to say, "remote dictatorial control of local neighborhoods" or "funnel money into handouts to black people and transit projects to shuttle them into nice neighborhoods and rob them", or whatever it is people are anxious about.
Editorial: Chesterfield mayor is poster child for municipal consolidation

http://www.stltoday.com/news/opinion/co ... b9a83.html