Contemporary Residential Architecture in St Louis?

A catch-all forum for urban discussion. If it doesn't fit elsewhere, post here.
Hi folks, new to the board and moving to St. Louis soon.

Was wondering, is contemporary residential something St. Louis gets behind? My cursory research shows a lot of historic preservation and rehab, a healthy respect for Modern, but almost no evidence of new construction favoring distinctive, emerging design.

I realize the neighborhoods have their own identities. I've been spoiled by the Austin, TX community, where the architecture scene is thriving. It's kind of normal to see a pier and beam next to a concrete monolith, next to an all-glass ranch home.

Here are links to some styles. Is anything like this welcome in St Louis city neighborhoods?

http://www.anderssonwise.com/projects/
http://www.alterstudio.net/
http://www.baldridge-architects.com/
http://bcarc.com/Work/residential
Depends a lot on the neighborhood. I believe that new structures built within the historic district boundaries in Lafayette Square, Soulard, and at least some parts of Benton Park have to reference a "model example" within the district. Other neighborhoods allow or encourage modern infill, even within historic districts. A lot of the modern infill here still favors brick facade, but I think you have a lot of flexibility in many neighborhoods. Some examples:

Central West End
Forest Park Southeast
Skinker-DeBaliviere
the Hill
Botanical Grove
Old North St. Louis
North Sarah

Not sure where this is, somewhere on Miami
Hi Baggage. Welcome aboard.

You do see some contemporary design at the higher price points in St. Louis, but you don't see enough at the level Joe Average can afford. I think the key is to hire the right architect if you plan to build.

Two you might check out are UIC and Space (http://www.space-stl.com/). UIC does some pretty cool infill in historic neighborhoods: http://uicstl.com/
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Thanks guys, exactly what I was looking for!

One article mentions the Grove neighborhood as being more open to new, interesting infill. Is the area a relatively residential area now, or would I be a "pioneer" setting up shop there?
^You won't be the pioneer.

The UIC house I posted above is in the Grove. It was a pretty rough area ten years ago but has really come a long way. Manchester Ave is the commercial strip that runs east-west through the neighborhood. It used to be mostly board-ups with a handful of gay bars at the eastern end. Today it has become a hot area for new restaurants, bars, and for arts and music venues. Urban Chestnut is also building a new brewery and beer garden along Manchester.

North and south of Manchester, the rest of the neghborhood is mostly residential. As a general rule, the homes are larger and more likely to be renovated in the northwestern part of the neighborhood. As you head south and east, though, you can find some bargains. I think everyone expects the Grove to gentrify fully over the next decade or so. It's location by Forest Park, CORTEX and Central West End have been a huge asset.
AND the Grove will soon be home to one of the city's first shipping container structures:

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source: http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/58702
Do you have something in mind that you want to build?
Presbyterian wrote:
Hi Baggage. Welcome aboard.

You do see some contemporary design at the higher price points in St. Louis, but you don't see enough at the level Joe Average can afford. I think the key is to hire the right architect if you plan to build.

Two you might check out are UIC and Space (http://www.space-stl.com/). UIC does some pretty cool infill in historic neighborhoods: http://uicstl.com/
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Here's a good writeup published yesterday on that house.

http://www.stlouis-mo.gov/government/de ... 8.facebook
BTW, I noticed a modern infill on the west side of Jamieson the other day. Any one seen it?
Looks like it was inspired by Chipperfield's art museum addition.
^ Yes.

The house has progressed since then, of course, but it looks pretty contemporary and nice in my book.
I have a flickr set of residential urban infill in St. Louis: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pasa/sets/ ... 617268196/
Great info guys, thanks a lot. We're just throwing around ideas right now, meaning we could go for rehabbing a home, but we were really interested in finding a lot to build something different. Problem is, we appreciate the elbow room of a house that doesn't sit right next to another, and I think those types of lots will be hard to find?

Definitely had the container idea in mind too, great to see it's already planned for the area.
^ Maybe. There are options, but the standard STL City building lot will be ~25ft x 120ft or so. The best place to pull together a couple lots will likely not be in the more developed neighborhoods.
A new environmentally-friendly residence in Dogtown: Passive house aggressively tackles energy efficiency
rbeedee wrote:
A new environmentally-friendly residence in Dogtown: Passive house aggressively tackles energy efficiency


A passive-aggressive house? Fine: whatever you want. :wink:
^LOL, I didn't notice that. Nicely done headline writer!
There was in article in today's P-D about contemporary residential infill: Contemporary home design catching on in the city
From the Post-Dispatch: Design standards proposed for St. Louis historic districts
In proposing standards for construction in St. Louis’ local historic districts, the city’s guardian of its architectural heritage says in a new report that 21st-century modernity and 19th-century stateliness can coexist side by side.

The new standards’ effect could vary by historic district. In the Central West End, for example, the Preservation Board already is approving modern versions of old buildings. Little would change in Soulard and Lafayette Square because ordinances require new construction to mimic those neighborhoods’ old buildings.
There's an interesting discussion over on 40 South News concerning a modern single-family infill proposed for Maplewood. One thing about the proposal that I know won't go over well with my fellow urbanists is that it has not one, but two curb cuts:

http://40southnews.com/creative-house-d ... ment-56881
Great piece by Greg Johnson over at NextSTL featuring modern infill in the Gate District:

https://nextstl.com/2017/10/gate-distri ... lafayette/

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