Historic home improvement

A catch-all forum for urban discussion. If it doesn't fit elsewhere, post here.
Wondering if anybody knows of a home improvement company or individual that specializes in remodeling South City homes. I have a traditional South City bungalow. I want to add a room that blends in with the existing plaster walls, old trim and woodwork. I want the room to look natural and blend in. Any suggestions??? Thanks in advance.

I would recommend giving Millenium Restoration a call. They are setup in South City and have done numerous beautiful restorations. They probably won't be the cheapest quote, but they will take care to make sure your addition looks original.

http://www.mrdcorp.com/about.html
DOGTOWNB&R wrote:
Wondering if anybody knows of a home improvement company or individual that specializes in remodeling South City homes. I have a traditional South City bungalow. I want to add a room that blends in with the existing plaster walls, old trim and woodwork. I want the room to look natural and blend in. Any suggestions??? Thanks in advance.




If you're going to do a room addition, you'll probably want to consult an architect first, maybe somebody like Killeen Studio.

^^...^ thanks for the info!

http://www.bluebrickconstruction.com has done some good work as well - gut rehabs and renovations

I second the recommendation for Millennium.

I heard about a store on Forest Park Pwy and one on Jefferson that sell doors, air vents and other items for older, historic homes. Does anyone know the names of these stores that sell these items? Thanks in advance.

There is a place near I-44 and Jefferson that fits that description, but I am blanking on the name. Forest Park Pkwy and Jefferson do not intersect.

^There are 2 individual stores, one on Jefferson and one on Forest Park Parkway, near Habitat for humanity I believe.

ReStore, 3763 Forest Park Parkway:



http://www.habitatstl.org/restore/

DOGTOWNB&R wrote:
^There are 2 individual stores, one on Jefferson and one on Forest Park Parkway, near Habitat for humanity I believe.




Oops, misread your post. Yes, the Restore is there, too.

^Thanks all!

There is also a great store on Cherokee, on the odd (north) side of the street between Salena and Wisconsin that has tons of doors architectural pieces

The place near 44 and Jefferson is called Architectural Artifacts (2711 Lafayette), in the past it was called After the Paint. It's about one block west of Jefferson.

For a little more info, here is a excerpt from the RFT and their phone number, 314-771-4442.



If you troll down Lafayette Avenue looking for Architectural Artifacts, you won't see any signs in front of the huge red-brick building. In fact, the number isn't even in the phone book and the doors are only open to the public between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturdays. To call the treasures inside the boarded-up warehouse "junk" would be ludicrous. Then again, if it wasn't for Bruce Gerrie and his team of salvage hounds, thousands of old doors, stained-glass windows and fireplace mantels that once graced St. Louis homes would have been thrown into a landfill when the houses fell to a wrecking ball. Thankfully, at least some of the city's architectural past has been saved for those of us who get teary-eyed at the sight of a five-foot-wide mahogany pocket door or a piece of red-veined marble rescued from the Ambassador Theater. Stuffed inside the old Dad's Root Beer bottling plant are more than 600 antique solid wood doors -- interior, exterior, glass-paned and paneled. One set of double doors from Argentina measures twelve and a half feet tall and sells for $5,000. If that's not in your budget, check out the hundreds of glass, brass and porcelain doorknobs and plates, scads of light fixtures, pallets full of sought-after St. Louis red brick and endless yards of stairs and railings. What a find!

DOGTOWNB&R wrote:
I heard about a store on Forest Park Pwy and one on Jefferson that sell doors, air vents and other items for older, historic homes. Does anyone know the names of these stores that sell these items? Thanks in advance.




Also Junque, which is on Broadway in the old Lemp brewery (look for the old bicycle parked by the doorway) has some of this kind of stuff too. Especially iron grates and vents. We found one there.

^Do you have a phone number or hours of operation for Junque at the Lemp?

^I'm afraid I don't. You could try looking them up online, though you might have better success just driving by and seeing if they are open :)



We went on a Saturday so I know they are open then, I think till at least 4 or so.
Anyone have any advice for pocket door repairs, or experience with a repairman? We have some nice old pocket doors that don't slide well currently, and scrape the floor. We had a general contractor come and take a look and he suggested disassembling the whole frame and possible sawing off some of the bottom of the door, which seems extreme and unnecessary to me at this point. I was hoping to get some recommendations for good companies/repairman from others. Thanks!
So I had a pocket door that was scraping the floor because over time the floor had buckled. Someone had forced the door to move over the buckled part, throwing it off its track. The solution involved both fixing the support beams in the basement to level off the floor as well as cutting a window in the plaster/drywall to get the door hardware back on track. If you need replacement hardware ( I doubt you would though) the place on Lafayette as well as Fellenz on Euclid near pershing are likely to have them.
^ I think for me it's more that one of the doors hangs at an angle on its track; it's not flush with the other door when closed, and I think that is leading to an edge dragging on the floor. I was hoping to avoid cutting a hole in the plaster since even the smallest plaster job seems to involve an unholy mess, but it may be unavoidable.
Time to revive an old thread!

Any recommendations for the following:

1) Historic home inspections - we've found the dream home (and it's MASSIVE) but want to make sure it's in stable condition before we pounce.
2) Wood siding refurbishment / replacement - we can't tell if the paint is just peeling or if it all needs to be replaced. Ideally, we'd like to keep the original wood siding if it's salvageable / not insanely expensive to repaint.
3) A general contractor who is familiar with renovating homes bit by bit - We're going to be on a EXTREMELY small and tight budget here, so we're going to have to go project by project on this house. Just want to ensure the exterior and structure is taken care of first before we turn our attention to the interior floors, walls, kitchen remodel, etc.

This will be in Alton btw so I doubt the south city recommendations would want to commute that far for work. Any more referrals?
While I can't speak to a good recommendation for #3, I can warn you to avoid the big GCs that come from St. Charles/St. Louis County and descend like locusts every year with pamphlets, door-to-door, "free quotes" followed by hard sells. They all want to do bathrooms, kitchens, siding, gutters, windows, and I've never had luck with them. They all want to get you to sign immediately and will offer the moon to close a deal. Beware.

Related: does anyone have an electrical contractor in south city that would be good for rewiring circuits, outlets, etc?
AMF electric is pretty good. They're on Sublette just south of Manchester. I've always found them to be reasonable
I have a friend that works with Collins and I've worked with them a very very little. They're good folks and they'll do right by you. I don't really know about what they charge, but they're honest and they do good work.