Central West End Density

A catch-all forum for urban discussion. If it doesn't fit elsewhere, post here.
Enjoyed an evening in CWE today and I must say, the Euclid corridor sure is hopping on a Tuesday night. With Citizen Park finished, the Euclid rising and One Hundred to begin soon, I can and can't imagine how dense this neighborhood will become more than it already is. What do you think the future of this area looks like, more dense or slowed growth?
^ CWE is definitely dense by St. Louis standards, but it's average urban density for many large coastal cities. So I would say the CWE can get more dense and will definitely get more dense. There is still a significant amount of vacant lots in the CWE and throughout the central corridor.
goat314 wrote:
Tue May 30, 2017 10:40 pm
^ CWE is definitely dense by St. Louis standards, but it's average urban density for many large coastal cities. So I would say the CWE can get more dense and will definitely get more dense. There is still a significant amount of vacant lots in the CWE and throughout the central corridor.
Here are photos showing the density of the area and how urban it really looks.

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The next one is a great street wall.

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^ & ^^^ Starting a topic and then immediately posting something completely off topic to self-promote one's own site. Nice.
wabash wrote:^ & ^^^ Starting a topic and then immediately posting something completely off topic to self-promote one's own site. Nice.
Not trying too. I had this Forum idea for some time. It's all supposed to tie in. If anyone else can find stories similar to mine or not about density in St. Louis, I welcome that. Not trying to promote my website at all, just trying to share my pictures of the neighborhood without having to go through the "coding" process on Google Chrome

In other words, I'll remove the story and post the photos using my phone.
The Central West End's density (population wise) is much more impressive when you consider the fact that roughly 1/3 of the land is occupied by BJC/Cortex/Ikea. That means the residential section density is probably over 10k/sq mi.
A reminder of just how much has been (and is being) added since circa Fall 2004:

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More shocking is just how little multi-family had been added for a long time before then. This blurb in a construction trade website noting the opening of the Metrolofts at Forest Park Ave. & Euclid starts starts with: "The first new apartment community in St. Louis’ Central West End neighborhood in nearly 30 years opened its doors recently."
RIP San Luis.
wabash wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:31 pm
A reminder of just how much has been (and is being) added since circa Fall 2004:

Image
Cool photo. It really shows what a difference 14 years makes. I wonder what vacant lot will be next for a proposal (besides the already known BJC Ambulatory care center at Taylor and Forest Park). My bets are split between Kingshighway and Lindell or Euclid and Lindell. I wish that cool building at Taylor and Lindell was still standing. Great Mid Century modern design but sadly, a parking lot for Rosati Kain is there now (as everyone knows) :( :cry: .
cardinalstl wrote:
Wed Jun 07, 2017 8:11 am
The Central West End's density (population wise) is much more impressive when you consider the fact that roughly 1/3 of the land is occupied by BJC/Cortex/Ikea. That means the residential section density is probably over 10k/sq mi.
I get about 1.3 sq. miles for CWE north of Forest Park Ave. so 11,000+ ppl./sq. mile in the residential sector. Of course there's the residential work going on at the old Shriner's. so that will add a few more souls south of FPA.... and if Cortex ever makes their long-sought mixed-use aspirations a reality.
I truly miss the old orange medical building that stood at the NE corner of Euclid & West Pine (where the Orion/Whole Foods now stands). It wasn’t sexy or upscale, but it was urban and functional, and was tall enough to make an impact on the CWE skyline (as evident in that aerial pic posted above). I remember when Subway was located Euclid-facing retail space of that building. I miss the Round Building even more. Damn, that one was a big loss for our urban skyline, and the driveway-centric, inward-facing townhouse development that replaced it is the epitome of 1990s faddishness. They are the shoulder pads of urban architecture (which means they will probably eventually become hipster pads if they stick around long enough!), lol.
stlgasm wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 12:39 am
I truly miss the old orange medical building that stood at the NE corner of Euclid & West Pine
I hate when people use "poor urban design" as an excuse when tearing down modernist buildings. These buildings can easily be adapted or they just need to be used properly. And ultimately they're not being torn down for their poor relation with the street, they're being torn down because people find them outdated and aren't creative enough to value their historic value.
A restaurant pavilion structure could have been built at Euclid and West Pine and the round tower could have been high end residential. And despite the name of this thread, there's still plenty of parking lots in the CWE to build on.
I pretty much agree with goat's comment...
goat314 wrote:
Tue May 30, 2017 10:40 pm
^ CWE is definitely dense by St. Louis standards, but it's average urban density for many large coastal cities. So I would say the CWE can get more dense and will definitely get more dense. There is still a significant amount of vacant lots in the CWE and throughout the central corridor.
We can easily reach 20,000 people in CWE (from the 14,400 in 2010 Census and likely another 1,000+ added since) through infill in the neighborhood. I think once we reach a population level closing in on 50,000 between a seamless Downtown-Downtown West-Midtown/Grand Center-CWE corridor we'll have reached a solid density for the area that will make one feel they really are in a thriving urban environment. That's roughly 10,000 people per sq. mile and will require a lot of infill work to accomplish, especially between 14th Street and Grand. But the land is there for sure.
STLrainbow wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 11:51 am
I think once we reach a population level closing in on 50,000 between a seamless Downtown-Downtown West-Midtown/Grand Center-CWE corridor we'll have reached a solid density for the area that will make one feel they really are in a thriving urban environment.
Restore the street grid, enhance bus service, build a single dedicated bicycle highway from downtown to CWE. If the Chouteau Greenway feeds into the CWE south of Forest Park Ave, it'll be great for Barnes employees living downtown but it won't help residents living north of Forest Park Ave get to downtown. Sorry for getting off topic here but this would be my ideal CWE to Downtown greenway trail. And yes, going through Wells Fargo like that would actually be possible. (also, I did this in photoshop 3 years ago so the Google Earth image is very outdated) ImageScreen Shot 2018-04-04 at 1.02.21 PM by Alex Price, on Flickr