^ I think some may submit their own ideas, but there's no reason why people here couldn't do just what you're saying. Someone can submit their own and contribute to another idea as well. I'm incorporating some ideas bandied about on the forum already. I wouldn't advise a large clearinghouse of comp...
I think something like that is very possible, and in fact we discussed just such an approach. We are not expecting a lot of initial ideas being submitted (between 6 and 10, perhaps, or even less), but the the posting of the results may inspire others to throw something into the idea pot. This is a c...
I would imagine that a vehicle traffic bridge experiences a loading factor that is only a fraction of what continuous lengths of fish tanks would be, but I was illustrating a worst case scenario. There are known examples of (at lease one bridge) that carry hundreds of thousands of moving gallons of ...
How about integrating a part of an aquarium into the bridge over the highway? An enclosed walkway with movable sidewalks and tanks for smaller fishes on either side. The weight of water is approximately 62 pounds per cubic foot. If there were a walkway with fish tanks along each side, at approximat...
Put an aquarium south of the highway! Don't be silly. It will compete with the one in Ballpark Village. Humor aside, I'd argue that an aquarium would generate too much parking demand, at this site, and a significant reason we should be concerned about the redevelopment of this site is that the dema...
As the discussion continues, it seems clear that in order to preserve this iconic building, its adaptation to re-purposed use may be ultimately necessary. This is what I believe is likely best, otherwise it would remain a drive-thru fry shack or a pile of concrete rubble on the ground by way of Spir...
Alex Ihnen wrote:
^ But to be honest, designers design what builders want built. It's up to communities to demand good design.


Yeah... so where do you see us in disagreement?
I suppose returning the rest of the land to nature would be out of the question... Right. I guess that represents failure and a step "backward". Seems like a good idea to me though. No- too many dirty hippies would arrive and make communist encampments and inject their young with marxism.
That's pretty much the fairest and most accurate assessment of the crap. It should have been obvious that this venture would be a failure from the outset, as is Boulevard St. Louis. Leave sensitive urban planning and land use decisions up to retail builders and mega-real estate developers, you end u...
You should read your book... and drink some wine.
Go do this, you guys... I wish I could join in but I've already got a few unfinished projects that are screaming at me to finish. Have fun.
That's Landmark Cinemas you're referring to, and don't forget the Hi-Point as well. These are the only movie theaters that I go to. I can't watch Hollywood schlock. It's worse than a vinyl sided house in the suburbs.
The building itself appears in fine condition, as I walked down its first floor halls after work this afternoon. I couldn't take photos because security was visible and watching, but I was told by a knowledgeable security person that the current tenant, Success Health Care, is engaged in a lawsuit w...
A retrofit here would be difficult if not a clinical use like the excellent idea of an animal hospital, because of the complex and expensive infrastructure hospitals are laden with. Seth proposed a possible mixed-use with residential, but I'd just simply say that unless there is proven higher value-...
word up.
Yeah, I just found that. Despite one's political leanings, having mention of a coffee crawl by them wouldn't hurt. It it were old, wooden ships in the harbor in Boston, we'd probably be having a tea crawl in tricorner hats to commemorate, despite one's political leanings. And the crawlers would be s...
Is there a St. Louis Coffee Party?
That's much more than simple construction cost, if that is an accurate figure. 10M/12K sf = $834.00/sf.
Yep. I know my definition is not for everyone, and that's fine. I just really insist that the effort be made to integrate to this level of directness whenever possible. It's just too easy to call everything under the sun a TOD otherwise.
My definition is that a TOD (of my ideal scale, which is small and not the scale defined by the CNU) must have direct relationship to the stop, and not simply proximity. Most typical stops on the San Jose light rail system (which is akin to streetcars or trams) are in the actual street corridor righ...
I suppose one could argue that the novelty itself would be a draw, and it would, but without a DIRECT relationship to the stop (i.e. not a bunch of transit riders standing outside at the platform, being fishbowled by the fine diners looking out the windows, and vice versa) I believe it would fail to...
If that commercial activity SERVED the transit users, then it would be a slam dunk. If it's just and upscale restaurant with the novelty of spanning a metrolink rail line (like the McDonald's outside of Joplin, Missouri on I-44 that spans the interstate), then it would be a disappointment, I believe.
...and this is why a more form-based system of zoning is superior to the current zoning model, because of the clearly stated protections of manifold layers of activity diversity (i.e. cyclists, pedestrians, shop window browsers, sidewalk cafe sitters, etc) would be built into the zoning code, not si...
When I walk in Maplewood, my experience is still one of 100% pedestrian comfort despite the prevalence of the curb cut driveway per single residence pattern. It's because I am in a residential street that makes the experience pedestrian-safe, not the frequency or width of sidewalk interruptions by d...
snap!